Origins

Origin Story

Note: This is a guest post by Jennifer Swanson, taking part in our Origins series about how music therapists working in end-of-life care trace their connection to this work. For more information about Jennifer, please refer to the “Contributors” tab. If you are interested in contributing a piece to the Origins series, please read more from our Call for Submissions.

How did I, the woman with initial aspirations to use music therapy to change the world by bringing together people in battling nations, or empowering women in Middle Eastern countries, or using music as joining language between different cultures, end up working with people at the very end of life? Continue reading “Origin Story”

Advertisements
Origins

Origin Story

Back in high school I took a career test. I filled out a hundred little bubbles on one of those multiple-choice questionnaires assessing strengths, weaknesses, likes, and dislikes in order to determine the top five careers in which I’d be most likely to succeed and find satisfaction. Of course, along with half of the other kids in my class, the top ranked result was “Music Therapist in End of Life Care.”

Just kidding.

Continue reading “Origin Story”

Origins

Origin Story

Here is the second post in our new ongoing series (to be posted on the 15th of each month) about how music therapists began work in end-of-life and palliative care settings. It is our hope that the telling of these stories will promote new perspectives from the storyteller, new introspection for the listeners, and a shared understanding of the privilege that it is to be working in EOL and palliative care.  If you work in end-of-life care, please consider submitting your story.

My origin story, the one about how I ended up working in end-of-life care, has two components.  Continue reading “Origin Story”

Origins

Man, what are you doing here?

Note: This is the first post in an ongoing series about how music therapists began work in end-of-life and palliative care settings. It is our hope that the telling of these stories will promote new perspectives from the storyteller, new introspection for the listeners, and a shared understanding of the privilege that it is to be working in EOL and palliative care.  I’ve spent a good deal of time thinking about what to say in this post, and, subsequently, have  delayed getting the words down. I suppose I wasn’t sure where to start, maybe because my pull towards hospice was so natural and emergent I never really got a sense of the soil those roots grew from. An easy starting point would be my undergraduate practicum experiences in hospice as an undergraduate, or perhaps my experiences in grief following both personal and professional losses. Continue reading “Man, what are you doing here?”