Best practice, General

Supervision Demystified III

This is our third of four posts this month on the topic of clinical supervision, borne of our collective enthusiasm for supervision processes and their value in each of our own journeys of clinical and professional development.  You may want to go back and read part I and part II before you continue reading below!  This week we will each talk a little bit more specifically about how and why we have found professional supervision to be an indispensable component to competent and satisfying clinical practice. Continue reading “Supervision Demystified III”

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Countertransference, General

There’s No Flirting in Hospice

Actually, yes, there is.  Let’s talk, for a bit, about the presence of sexuality between us, the end-of-life music therapists, and the people to whom we provide care — meaning our patients and whoever else is included when we come for our sessions.  Our music therapy literature barely acknowledges that sexuality exists — almost as if music therapists don’t have sex, or sexual thoughts, and neither do our patients.  But we know otherwise. Continue reading “There’s No Flirting in Hospice”

Multidisciplinary

Intersections of Depth Psychology and Music Therapy

This post is our next in the new series of posts focused on music therapy and interdisciplinary work in end-of-life care.  I’m bringing you my contribution as a music therapist who is also trained as a depth psychotherapist.

I decided to pursue doctoral work in depth psychotherapy because of my private practice.  I had my bachelors and masters in music therapy, and I also had done post-grad training with Diane Austin, but I didn’t feel like any of these prepared me for the range and depth of material that emerged when I started working one-on-one with the group that is sometimes known as “the walking wounded,” people like all of us who are living life, negotiating relationships and meeting life’s responsibilities, but suffering deeply underneath.  I have grown and changed immensely as a private practice psychotherapist from my depth coursework and supervision, but I feel that depth psychology has been a helpful contributor to my end-of-life music therapy work as well. Continue reading “Intersections of Depth Psychology and Music Therapy”

General

What’s a “music preference” without relationship?

“Music preference” is a big buzz word in EOL and palliative care, dominating many recent discussions about assessment and treatment planning. There seems to be, in fact,  an overall push in the larger music therapy narrative for an increased focus on emphasizing preference in most areas of clinical work. The spirit behind this push makes a lot of sense: we want to engender in our clients feelings of empowerment and self-determination that can first manifest in the clinical setting and then in real-life scenarios. Increasingly, however, I’m questioning whether preference is the right approach. Continue reading “What’s a “music preference” without relationship?”