Multidisciplinary

Intersections of Depth Psychology and Music Therapy

This post is our next in the new series of posts focused on music therapy and interdisciplinary work in end-of-life care.  I’m bringing you my contribution as a music therapist who is also trained as a depth psychotherapist.

I decided to pursue doctoral work in depth psychotherapy because of my private practice.  I had my bachelors and masters in music therapy, and I also had done post-grad training with Diane Austin, but I didn’t feel like any of these prepared me for the range and depth of material that emerged when I started working one-on-one with the group that is sometimes known as “the walking wounded,” people like all of us who are living life, negotiating relationships and meeting life’s responsibilities, but suffering deeply underneath.  I have grown and changed immensely as a private practice psychotherapist from my depth coursework and supervision, but I feel that depth psychology has been a helpful contributor to my end-of-life music therapy work as well. Continue reading “Intersections of Depth Psychology and Music Therapy”

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Foundational concepts

Depth

What does it mean to do “deep” work in end-of-life care?  Does deep just mean that we feel deeply?  Does it mean that we feel like we deeply understand the patient or family member that we are working with?  I’m considering this post to be a sort of primer to depth work in end-of-life care, as I conceive of it, and a place to introduce some concepts that all the editors will probably be writing about at some point or another. Continue reading “Depth”